Academic Calendar - 2018

Western University Academic Calendar. - 2018

Courses


Course Numbering

0001-0999* Pre-University level introductory courses
1000-1999 Year 1 courses
2000-4999 Senior-level undergraduate courses
5000-5999 Professional Degree courses in Dentistry, Education, Law, Medicine and Theology (MTS, MDiv)
6000-6999 Courses offered by Continuing Studies
9000-9999 Graduate Studies courses

* These courses are equivalent to pre-university introductory courses and may be counted for credit in the student's record, unless these courses were taken in a preliminary year. They may not be counted toward essay or breadth requirements, or used to meet modular admission requirements unless it is explicitly stated in the Senate-approved outline of the module.


Suffixes

no suffix 1.0 course not designated as an essay course
A 0.5 course offered in first term
B 0.5 course offered in second term
A/B 0.5 course offered in first and/or second term
E 1.0 essay course
F 0.5 essay course offered in first term
G 0.5 essay course offered in second term
F/G 0.5 essay course offered in first and/or second term
H 1.0 accelerated course (8 weeks)
J 1.0 accelerated course (6 weeks)
K 0.75 course
L 0.5 graduate course offered in summer term (May - August)
Q/R/S/T 0.25 course offered within a regular session
U 0.25 course offered in other than a regular session
W/X 1.0 accelerated course (full course offered in one term)
Y 0.5 course offered in other than a regular session
Z 0.5 essay course offered in other than a regular session

Glossary


Prerequisite

A course that must be successfully completed prior to registration for credit in the desired course.


Corequisite

A course that must be taken concurrently with (or prior to registration in) the desired course.


Antirequisite

Courses that overlap sufficiently in course content that both cannot be taken for credit.


Essay Courses

Many courses at Western have a significant writing component. To recognize student achievement, a number of such courses have been designated as essay courses and will be identified on the student's record (E essay full course; F/G/Z essay half-course).


Principal Courses

A first year course that is listed by a department offering a module as a requirement for admission to the module. For admission to an Honors Specialization module or Double Major modules in an Honors Bachelor degree, at least 3.0 courses will be considered principal courses.



Campus





Course Level






Course Type




Anthropology


An introduction to anthropology (the study of human beings, past and present) co-taught by specialists in biological anthropology, archaeology, linguistic anthropology, and sociocultural anthropology. Students will explore anthropological approaches to and findings concerning: human evolution; variation and adaptation; diverse forms of social, political, and economic organization; culture; ritual; language; communication; identity; gender; health; social inequality; and globalization.


Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour. Note: Students interested in earning essay course credit are encouraged to take Anthropology 1025F/G and Anthropology 1026F/G instead of Anthropology 1020.

Course Weight: 1.00
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An introduction to the basic concepts used in the anthropological study of non-Western social and cultural institutions that focuses on the unity and diversity of human experience. Topics include: kinship, economics, politics, religion, and the present-day conditions of indigenous societies. The ethnography of various peoples is discussed.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E).

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is also offered at:

Brescia

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An introduction to the basic concepts used in the anthropological study of non-Western social and cultural institutions that focuses on the unity and diversity of human experience. Topics include: kinship, economics, politics, religion, and the present-day conditions of indigenous societies. The ethnography of various peoples is discussed.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E).

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is also offered at:

Western Main Campus

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An introduction to aspects of biological anthropology and archaeology which help us to understand the place of humankind in nature. Topics to be covered include heredity, human evolution and variability, archaeological method, the development of culture, the domestication of plants and animals, and the rise of civilization and the state.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E).

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is also offered at:

Brescia

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An introduction to aspects of biological anthropology and archaeology which help us to understand the place of humankind in nature. Topics to be covered include heredity, human evolution and variability, archaeological method, the development of culture, the domestication of plants and animals, and the rise of civilization and the state.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E).

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is also offered at:

Western Main Campus

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Introduction to basic concepts and methods of modern linguistics. Topics include articulatory and acoustic phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. This course is a prerequisite for subsequent linguistics courses in the Department of Anthropology and/or the Linguistics program.

Antirequisite(s): Linguistics 2288A/B.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The field of archaeology, with emphasis on the major discoveries of the discipline. Topics include the evolution of humans, their spread throughout the world, the origins of agriculture, urbanization, and the development of early civilizations. Major archaeological sites like Olduvai Gorge, Stonehenge, Giza, Ur and Teotihuacan will be discussed.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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An examination of spectacular archaeological sites around the world, including many on the UNESCO World Heritage List. The course covers sites of complex hunter-gatherers and farmers, and early states and empires in Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Aegean, Asia and Mesoamerica, the Andes and the Classical World.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores the relationship between language and sex/gender systems from a critical linguistic anthropology perspective. Areas investigated include: language and gender stereotypes; gender variation in language usage; power and women's status; and male vs female communicative styles in different contexts.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2251F/G, the former Linguistics 2185A/B, the former Linguistics 2286F/G, the former Linguistics 2287F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science course.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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We examine languages and dialects that are associated with particular regions, cultures, and/or ethnic groups in Canada, including First Nations languages, French, English and immigrant languages. We consider language structures, variation and ways that languages relate to the identity of groups which speak them.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2252F/G, or the former Linguistics 2185A/B, the former Linguistics 2285F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science course.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Today, with over half the world population living in cities, urban field sites have become the norm for many anthropologists. Through case studies, this course introduces key topics, debates, and insights associated with urban anthropology and invites reflection on the contributions anthropology can make to urban studies.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An examination of natural resource development emphasizing the interplay between indigenous people, the state and transnational developers. Topics include: environmentalism and livelihood; land rights; corporate power and state policies; common property and community-based resource management; NGOs in environmental politics; sustainability and the greening of development.

Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2203F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An introduction to the Caribbean and circum- Caribbean, emphasizing religion, aesthetic styles, current political processes, and relationships of the region and its peoples to Canada.

Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2211F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 hours. Usually only two of Anthropology 2211F/G, Anthropology 2212F/G, Anthropology 2216F/G, and Anthropology 2219F/G will be offered in any given year.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The cultures of Polynesia, Micronesia and Melanesia with an emphasis on indigenous social structures. Other topics include ecology and economy, male-female relations, ritual and cosmology, hierarchical and egalitarian political systems, Pacific history, and contemporary political and economic issues.

Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2212F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 hours. Usually only two of Anthropology 2211F/G, Anthropology 2212F/G, Anthropology 2216F/G, and Anthropology 2219F/G will be offered in any given year.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The cultural history of Latin American societies. Topics include the historical formation of indigenous communities, and a wide variety of contemporary social problems in Latin America.

Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2216F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 hours. Usually only two of Anthropology 2211F/G, Anthropology 2212F/G, Anthropology 2216F/G, and Anthropology 2219F/G will be offered in any given year.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A critical examination of approaches that tend to homogenize and dehistoricize Middle Eastern peoples. The course provides an historical overview that reveals regional heterogeneity, and shifts in peoples, powers and borders. Due to the immensity and complexity of the region, the thematic focus will change regularly.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours. Usually only two of Anthropology 2211F/G, Anthropology 2212F/G, Anthropology 2216F/G, and Anthropology 2219F/G will be offered in any given year.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Sociocultural Anthropologists commonly debate the foundations of their discipline. What are the goals of Sociocultural Anthropology? How should we be doing it, and why? For whom do we do it? This course contextualizes such key debates focusing especially on what they tell us about the discipline's past, present, and future.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E) or Anthropology 1025F/G.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will explore the methodology of anthropological fieldwork. The emphasis will be less on reading about anthropology and more on actually doing what anthropologists do. Assignments will focus on participant observation and include talking with people, observing what they are doing and taking part in their activities.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E) or Anthropology 1025F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A cross-cultural exploration of religion as a system of practices, knowledge and belief. Topics include: human predicaments and ideas of the sacred; traditional religions in their cultural, social, and political dimensions; world religions and their spread; modernity, utopias and revivals; contemporary religions in local and global terms.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 3326F/G taught in Winter 2010.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A survey of the major areas of biological anthropology, including heredity, paleo-anthropology, human adaptability and variability, and growth and development.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E), or Anthropology 1025F/G and Anthropology 1026F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of current interest in Anthropology. List of special topics available in the Department.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course provides an overview of the goals, theory and analytical methods of archaeology as practised by anthropologists. The course serves to provide a basic appreciation of how one is able to go from the material remains of past peoples to statements about the nature of their cultural systems, and also, how archaeologists are uniquely poised to address certain general questions of concern to all anthropologists.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E), or Anthropology 1025F/G and Anthropology 1026F/G.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An overview and critical evaluation of reconstructions of past ways of life in the Arctic. The course will introduce prehistoric cultures as archaeologically defined and examine the use of ethnography in archaeological interpretation, the role of cultural contact in culture change, and the use of archaeology in constructing contemporary identity.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E) or Anthropology 1026F/G

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The prehistoric societies of Ontario and surrounding areas. Topics include the entry of humans into the New World and their arrival in Ontario; development of agriculture; appearance of historic period societies such as the Huron, Neutral and Ojibwa; impact of European settlement and economic systems on native societies.

Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2233F/G.


Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will focus primarily on the prehistory of the Peruvian Andes and Coast, with some overlap into Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile and Amazonia. We will study the area's archaeological record in some detail, touching on a variety of themes that are of general archaeological interest, e.g. agricultural origins, trade, the rise of complex societies, the role of religious ideology, and the interpretation of archaeological evidence.

Antirequisite(s) at Main campus: First Nations Studies 2234F/G.


Extra Information: 3 hours. Note for Main campus: Students intending to apply for the Archaeological Summer Field Course in Peru are strongly encouraged to take this course first.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is also offered at:

Brescia

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This course will focus primarily on the prehistory of the Peruvian Andes and Coast, with some overlap into Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile and Amazonia. We will study the area's archaeological record in some detail, touching on a variety of themes that are of general archaeological interest, e.g. agricultural origins, trade, the rise of complex societies, the role of religious ideology, and the interpretation of archaeological evidence.

Antirequisite(s) at Main campus: First Nations Studies 2234F/G.


Extra Information: 3 hours. Note for Main campus: Students intending to apply for the Archaeological Summer Field Course in Peru are strongly encouraged to take this course first.

Course Weight: 0.50
More details

This course is also offered at:

Western Main Campus

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Recovering remains and identifying victims and perpetrators of crimes is at the core of forensic science. This course details methods used in crime scene analysis using a case study format. Topics include: archaeology, entomology, vital statistics (i.e., age, sex, stature, race) of skeletons, fingerprinting, and DNA (nuclear and mitochondrial).

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Social Science, Health Sciences, or Science course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines biological changes of the human body from birth to old age, using a systems approach to document and evaluate populational patterns of growth and development. It emphasizes methods used in bioarchaeology to estimate chronological age from calcified tissue and problems associated with senescence (i.e., osteoarthritis and osteoporosis).

Prerequisite(s): Any one of the following: Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E), Anthropology 1026F/G, Sociology 1020, Sociology 1021E, Biology 1225, Biology 1290B, the former Biology 1222, the former Biology 1223, Health Sciences 1001A/B and Health Sciences 1002A/B; or the former Health Sciences 1000.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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While alive our bodily tissues store a tremendous amount of information. These clues can be used to tell a lot about a person’s life and death. This information is explored in three contexts: Living Individuals, Recently Deceased Individuals (focus on forensic applications), and Older Deceased Individuals (focus on archaeological applications).

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Social Science, Health Sciences, or Science course.

Extra Information: 3.0 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Mummies are of interest to archaeologists and to the general public. Mummies are people and they speak to us from across the centuries. This course takes an interdisciplinary, scientific and cultural approach to the study of human mummies to discuss issues of ethics, science and cross-cultural perspectives on death.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Social Science, Health Sciences, or Science course.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Culture is investigated using linguistic methods and techniques. Topics include: the analysis of lexical sets, cognitive categories, language as a symbolic communicative process, non-verbal communication, conversational analysis.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E), or Anthropology 1025F/G, or Anthropology 1027A/B, or Linguistics 2288A/B.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines reading and writing from an anthropological perspective. It looks at how writing originated based on archeological evidence and at the sociocultural consequences of this invention. Then it explores various writing systems around the world as well as the effects of the introduction of literacy in societies.

Prerequisite(s): One of Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E), Anthropology 1027A/B, Linguistics 2288A/B or permission from the instructor.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Analysis of the contexts in which sentences occur and of the communicative functions they carry. Topics include: theme/rheme, information structure, deixis, presupposition, conversational implicature, speech acts and conversational analysis.


Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines the artful and playful use of spoken language in relation to social organization and cultural practices. Topics include: structures and patterns in speech play, participation of the audience in the performance, evaluation of competence, issues of authenticity and identity, and the tension between tradition and innovation.

Prerequisite(s): One of Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E), Anthropology 1027A/B, Linguistics 2288A/B or permission from the instructor.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores the relationship between language and sex/gender systems from a critical linguistic anthropological perspective. Areas investigated include: language and gender stereotypes; gender variation in language usage; power and women's status; and male vs female communicative styles in different contexts. An essay on a relevant topic is required.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2151A/B, the former Linguistics 2185A/B, the former Linguistics 2286F/G, the former Linguistics 2287F/G.


Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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We examine languages and dialects that are associated with particular regions, cultures, and/or ethnic groups in Canada, including First Nations languages, French, English and immigrant languages. We consider language structures, variation and ways that languages relate to the identity of groups which speak them.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2152A/B, the former Linguistics 2185A/B, the former Linguistics 2285F/G.

Prerequisite(s): One of Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E), Anthropology 1025F/G, Anthropology 1027A/B, First Nations Studies 1020E, or Linguistics 2288A/B.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Critical assessment of feminist theory and methodology for cross-cultural interpretations. Topics include: critical examination of gender, division of labor, power, production and reproduction, ideology, communication, "nature"; controversies over nature/nurture, nature/culture, public/private.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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This course examines how changing notions of social control, sanitation, property value, class, security, and individual well-being have shaped the social production of green spaces in urban environments. We will also explore how green spaces are experienced by urban inhabitants and influence their imagination of the city.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Archaeology is often portrayed in popular culture: on television and in the movies, on the internet, in comics, video games and news media. This course examines how both non-archaeologists and archaeologists present archaeology to the public and considers what these representations imply about the relationship between archaeology and modern society.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course focuses on communities of commodity producers and consumers in an integrated global political economy. Weekly lectures centre on particular commodities (rubber, gold, sapphires, oil, water, etc.) and on how anthropologists have attempted to study the roots and effects of their production and consumption.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Bodies are physical and sensual, personal and public, the result of evolution, and yet flexibly attuned to local histories and desires. This course will take a biocultural approach to exploring what bodies are, how they are used, by whom, for what purposes, and how we come to know such things.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A consideration of conservation issues confronting primatologists, including: conservation assessment, variables for understanding the conservation biology of nonhuman primate populations, biogeographic patterns contributing to declining primate populations, strategies in primate conservation, and how ethnoprimatology - the study of interactions between humans and nonhuman primate populations - can be useful in primate conservation.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course considers the behavioral patterns, and diversity, exhibited across species of the Order Primates. Critical examination of theoretical models developed to explain primate behavior is emphasized. Topics covered, using species comparisons, include socioecological contexts of primate behavior, reproduction, growth and development, kinship and dominance, communication and cognition.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Modern zoos characterize themselves as key players in conserving endangered species. But, is this message getting across to zoo visitors? This course utilizes anthropological and interdisciplinary approaches to assess key aspects of zoo-based conservation action, and the extent to which zoos can generate public engagement in 21st century conservation concerns.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics in the anthropological study of environment and culture.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines the dynamics of family and kinship cross-culturally in traditional and globalizing contexts. We will explore themes including variability in family form, marriage patterns, gender relations, household economics, historical change in family structure, and the effects of globalization and modernity on family structure and practice.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines various aspects of tourism from an anthropological point of view. Topics will include the cultural effects of tourism on both hosts and guests, on the political and economic issues involved in tourism, on the connection between tourism and environmental concerns, and on conflict over local resources.

Prerequisite(s): At least a 0.5 Essay course in any faculty.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores sex and gender as concepts that are socially and culturally constructed within and across cultures. Emphasizing critical and thoughtful reading, analysis, and discussion, the course addresses how shared understandings of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion and class affect people’s experiences of their social worlds.

Extra Information: 3 hours per week.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores the economic lives of people across a variety of cultures. Topics will include social and political economy, economics and morality, gifts and exchange, labour and production, commodities and consumption, fair trade, and concepts of land and mortgage.

Prerequisite(s): At least a 0.5 Essay course in any faculty.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Third World responses to development from an anthropological perspective, with emphasis on the impact of market institutions on indigenous societies. Topics include the impact of aid, wage labor and urbanization on peasant communities; local versus national priorities in development; and risk aversion and technological innovation among small farmers.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will examine human migration from an anthropological perspective that includes a brief historical overview of human mobility, case studies from around the world, and theoretical attempts to explain and predict human migration.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines populations forcibly uprooted from their original habitats due to armed conflict, famine, environmental disasters and 'development.' It emphasizes the need to examine displacement in specific contexts. Topics include: the impact of displacement on society and culture, 'home' and exile, humanitarian aid, resistance and resilience in host-countries.

Prerequisite(s): Any Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A comparative study of the role of new information and communications technologies in the developing world. Topics include: connectivity and access; adoptions and appropriations; communications in development; mobile phones and transnational migration; youth, gender and mobile technologies; the internet and popular politics; new technologies and expanded worlds.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course focuses on the anthropological study of clothing and fashion. It will critically examine the meaning of clothing and the role it plays in the formation of identities and the negotiation of power inequalities. It will further explore the social and political-economic processes that influence clothing production and consumption.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2293F/G taken in 2015-2016.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics in refugee and migrant studies.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An exploration of the social and cultural basis of health, disease, and healing. We will examine patterns of illness and epidemics, social and cultural aspects of risk, the use of ritual in healing, and the politics of health, among other issues, from an ethnographic and historical perspective.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science course.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science course.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science course.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science course.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science course.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science course.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science course.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science course.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students elicit and record linguistic data from a native speaker of a designated language and then study its phonological and lexical-grammatical systems. Selected aspects of the language are analyzed in terms of current problems in linguistic theory.

Prerequisite(s): Linguistics 2247A/B or the former Anthropology 2247A/B and Linguistics 2248A/B or the former Anthropology 2248A/B.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A survey of practical applications of linguistic theory. Topics may include discussion of the relevance of linguistic research to language teaching and learning, communication disorders, language policy development and language revitalization, translation and intercultural communication, media, law, business, communication technologies, and social justice.

Antirequisite(s): The former Anthropology 2243F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in third or fourth year, and Linguistics 2247A/B or Linguistics 2248A/B.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines the reconstitution of identities as people reclaim histories and territories, challenging nation-states and traditional identity references. The course examines different situations through case studies in colonial and post-colonial societies. Key issues to be discussed include: memory/history; territory, displacement and deterritorialization; citizenship, nation and the state.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course and registration in third year or higher in any program.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course provides a practical introduction to field methods and preliminary laboratory techniques of archaeology. Practical training will be given at a field camp to be held at an archaeological site near London.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2229F/G and registration in Anthropology module Year 3 or 4. Application required.

Extra Information: Sessions and hours by arrangement. Permission must be obtained by application to the Department by July 15th of the academic year prior to when the course is scheduled to be offered. Applications are available in the Department of Anthropology.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines contemporary theoretical frameworks in archaeology and explores how they shape and are shaped by current issues, the development of new methods, and archaeological practice around the globe.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2229F/G and registration in Year 3 or 4 in any Anthropology module.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An overview of issues concerning hunter-gatherers from both an archaeological and ethnographic perspective. Topics include: the usefulness of the "hunter-gatherer" category, debates about the original state of human nature, and the causes of subsistence and societal variability including the shift to agriculture and the development of non-egalitarian societies.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An introduction to the range of information about past human groups gleaned from the animal remains. Lectures will cover various topics in zooarchaeological theory and practice. Labs will teach the basics of skeletal identification for fish, birds and mammals, and will provide experience in the identification of fragmentary archaeological remains.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2229F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/lab hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An introduction to current theoretical and methodological issues in bioarchaeology. Use of ancient human, animal, and plant tissues to reconstruct relationships among biology, culture and environment in international contexts is emphasized. Topics include: diet, demography, disease, identity, mobility, landscape, childhood, gender, ideology, political economy, violence, work, urbanism, and globalization.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2226A/B or Anthropology 2229F/G or instructor's permission.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines how archaeologists interpret the archaeological record dating from European colonial expansion to the emergence of modern capitalism. We will explore how the material and written record allow archaeologists to understand class, gender, racial and power differences, and consider the implications of these findings for contemporary archaeological practice.


Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course provides students with a hands-on introduction to the identification, analysis and interpretation of a range of archaeological artifacts including lithics, ceramics and organics. Students will work with archaeological collections that are available for analysis. Extra information: 3 hours.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2229F/G or permission of the instructor.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An advanced, hands-on introduction to the practice of field archaeology. Students will participate in intensive, problem-oriented, research excavations and field laboratory work on an undisturbed archaeological site. Students should be prepared to cover necessary travel and living expenses. Limited enrollment. 4 weeks.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1026F/G, Anthropology 2229F/G, and registration in year 3 or 4 of any Anthropology module, or permission of the Department Chair.

Extra Information: Permission by application to the Department of Anthropology. Students intending to apply to participate in this course are strongly encouraged to prepare by taking a relevant second year area course in archaeology.

Course Weight: 1.00
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This course offers students the opportunity to study current issues in anthropology through participation in extended fieldtrips and collaborative research projects during Intersession or summer terms. Students should be prepared to cover necessary travel and living expenses. Details typically will be available in the Department by October. Applications required.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in year 3 or 4 of any module and permission of the instructor.

Course Weight: 1.00
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This course offers students the opportunity to study current issues in environmental anthropology through participation in extended fieldtrips and collaborative research projects during Intersession or summer terms. Students should be prepared to cover necessary travel and living expenses. Applications required and available in on Anthropology website.

Prerequisite(s): Application required.

Extra Information: 4 weeks.

Course Weight: 1.00
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This course offers students the opportunity to study current issues in anthropology through participation in short-term fieldtrips and collaborative research projects during Intersession or summer terms. Students should be prepared to cover necessary travel and living expenses. Details typically will be available in the Department by October. Applications required.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in year 3 or 4 of any module and permission of the instructor.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is about doing fieldwork to preserve an archaeological site using non-invasive and minimally intrusive methods. Fieldwork will focus on the archaeology of past archaeologies, the use of geophysical equipment, and address the contested heritage values such locales hold in society that we as archaeologists need to service.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year in any program.

Extra Information: Application required (see Department website). Lecture/fieldwork, 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Individual reading and research of current interest in Anthropology. Students are responsible for making arrangements with an Anthropology faculty member. An application must be completed with approval from the Instructor and the Chair. Applications are available on the Anthropology website.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third year in any program. Application required.

Extra Information: Hours to be arranged with Instructor.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of current interest in Anthropology. List of special topics may be available in the Department.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third year in any program.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of interest in Anthropology. List of special topics available in the Anthropology Department.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third year in any Anthropology module, or permission of the Department.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Ethnographies are the written products of fieldwork in sociocultural anthropology. This course will introduce students to ethnography by guiding them through readings of classic and recent examples of the genre, concerning diverse topics, people and contexts. Special attention will be paid to the relationship between ethnographic research and writing.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year in any Anthropology module.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines how various stages in the human lifecourse are understood and experienced differently in diverse socio-cultural contexts. It begins with a cross-cultural examination of theories of conception and then proceeds similarly through discussions of birth, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, elderhood, death and the afterlife.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Explores Anthropological theories and analyses of symbol systems. Frameworks examined include among others; structuralism, theory of metaphor, textual analysis and performance theory. This course emphasizes the application of such frameworks to the analysis of ritual, narrative, and the ideologies of social life.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2222F/G or Anthropology 2245F/G and registration in year 3 or 4 in any module.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will combine general principles of vertebrate paleontology and evolutionary biology to examine the fossil evidence for primate and human evolution. Important events, such as primate and hominid origins will be investigated in detail, emphasizing the cross-disciplinary nature of this field of study.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2226A/B and registration in year 3 or 4 in any module.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course provides an overview of the fossil evidence for human evolution as a background for the critical examination of controversies in the field. Areas to be explored include human taxonomy, the evolution of human behaviour and the origin of modern humans.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2226A/B and registration in year 3 or 4 in any module.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An exploration of the role that skeletal material plays in providing anthropological information. Emphasis will be placed on the analytical techniques used in osteology and odontology for: measuring biological adaptability in archaeological populations; creating individual biographies; the reconstruction of cultural activities.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2226A/B and registration in year 3 or 4 in any module.

Extra Information: 1 lecture hour, 2 laboratory hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course uses approaches from sociolinguistics and historical linguistics to explore topics related to variation across and within languages and linguistic changes over time. Topics covered may include: sound change, morphological change, syntactic change, linguistic reconstruction, variations according to class, gender, age, ethnicity, communities of practice, and place.

Prerequisite(s): Linguistics 2247A/B or the former Anthropology 2247A/B and registration in third or fourth year of any Linguistics or Anthropology module.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The role of bioanthropology in the genesis of the emerging field of evolutionary medicine is explored. We examine the natural history of the diseases that affect modern western societies as reconstructed from our ancestral remains and historical texts, and the implications of disease history for understanding causes of modern diseases.

Prerequisite(s): One of: Anthropology 2226A/B, Biology 1001A or Biology 1201A.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An examination of cultural attitudes to diet and subsistence and their effects on human biology in both ancient and modern contexts. Areas to be explored include: subsistence strategies and modelling; food ideology and metaphor; processing and preparation; the effects of diet on growth and development; diet related diseases.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2222F/G and Anthropology 2226A/B and registration in year 3 or 4 in any module.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course offers students the opportunity to study current issues in language revitalization through participation in collaborative research projects on site with a community partner. Projects will vary depending on the needs of the community and the skillset brought by the students.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 3323A/B if taken in the Summer of 2016.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in year 3 or 4 of any module and permission of the instructor.

Extra Information: lecture/fieldwork, 3 hours. Recommended for students in Anthropology, First Nations Studies or Linguistics.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores where anthropology came from, what influenced its early questions, and how those questions evolved over time, through an examination of some classic anthropological work on society and culture.

Antirequisite(s): the former Anthropology 3301E.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year in any Anthropology module.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines the various principles through which societies are organized, by examining the construction of social formations and social identities over time in contexts of differential power.

Antirequisite(s): the former Anthropology 3301E.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 3350F and third or fourth year standing in any anthropology module.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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As one of the most popular monsters in film, zombies speak to us about our own desires and fears. This course locates the contemporary figure of the zombie in cultural and historical perspective, with specific focus on the zombie in Haitian and American cultures.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year in any program.

Extra Information: 3 hours per week.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Advanced special topics in the anthropological study of environment and culture.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Advanced special topics in refugee and migrant studies.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year in any program.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year in any program.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year in any program.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year in any program.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year in any program.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year in any program.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year in any program.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year in any program.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Exploration of current anthropological debates and contemporary theoretical frameworks as they may be used in the analysis of anthropological problems and thought.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 3350F (or the former Anthropology 3301E), and registration in Year 4 in any module.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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This course will explore disease and diet in past human populations. A range of topics within paleopathology, the study of ancient disease, and paleodiet, the study of ancient diet, will be investigated to learn what can and cannot be discerned about human health in the past.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year in Anthropology, and permission of the instructor. Completion of Anthropology 3338F/G is recommended.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines linkages between linguistic practices and relations of power, drawing primarily on techniques of discourse analysis.

Prerequisite(s): Fourth year standing in Anthropology or Linguistics or permission from the department.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Studying disease in ancient populations requires a multidisciplinary approach integrating basic skeletal biological knowledge, clinical diagnostic skills, and epidemiological models integrated within archaeological contexts, including paleoenvironmental reconstructions. This course provides a detailed understanding of the complexities of diagnosing disease in archaeological samples and determining the health status of ancient populations.

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2226A/B or permission of the department.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will examine the principles and concerns that are integral to the practice of applied archaeology in North America and the role of applied archaeology in heritage management. The course will review legislation and professional practices that govern applied archaeologists who undertake Cultural Resource Management (CRM).

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year in Anthropology. Application Required.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Individual reading and research of current interest in Anthropology. Students are responsible for making arrangements with an Anthropology faculty member. An application must be completed with approval from the Instructor and the Chair. Applications are available on the Anthropology website.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year in any program with approval from the Instructor and the Department Chair.

Extra Information: Hours to be arranged with Instructor.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of current interest in Anthropology. List of special topics may be available in the Department.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year in any program.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students will be integrated into a faculty research project, gaining hands-on experience in research through sustained interaction with a faculty supervisor. The instructor and the student will apply to the Department Chair detailing the research activities that the student will undertake; approval from Department Chair required.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year in any Anthropology module, with a minimum average of 80% in courses at the 2000-level and above, or instructor permission.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of current interest in Anthropology. List of special topics may be available in the Department.

Prerequisite(s): Application required.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of current interest in Anthropology. List of special topics may be available in the Department.

Prerequisite(s): Application required.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of current interest in Anthropology. List of special topics may be available in the Department.

Prerequisite(s): Application required.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of current interest in Anthropology. List of special topics may be available in the Department.

Prerequisite(s): Application required.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of current interest in Anthropology. List of special topics may be available in the Department.

Prerequisite(s): Application required.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of current interest in Anthropology. List of special topics may be available in the Department.

Prerequisite(s): Application required.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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