Academic Calendar - 2018

Western University Academic Calendar. - 2018

Courses


Course Numbering

0001-0999* Pre-University level introductory courses
1000-1999 Year 1 courses
2000-4999 Senior-level undergraduate courses
5000-5999 Professional Degree courses in Dentistry, Education, Law, Medicine and Theology (MTS, MDiv)
6000-6999 Courses offered by Continuing Studies
9000-9999 Graduate Studies courses

* These courses are equivalent to pre-university introductory courses and may be counted for credit in the student's record, unless these courses were taken in a preliminary year. They may not be counted toward essay or breadth requirements, or used to meet modular admission requirements unless it is explicitly stated in the Senate-approved outline of the module.


Suffixes

no suffix 1.0 course not designated as an essay course
A 0.5 course offered in first term
B 0.5 course offered in second term
A/B 0.5 course offered in first and/or second term
E 1.0 essay course
F 0.5 essay course offered in first term
G 0.5 essay course offered in second term
F/G 0.5 essay course offered in first and/or second term
H 1.0 accelerated course (8 weeks)
J 1.0 accelerated course (6 weeks)
K 0.75 course
L 0.5 graduate course offered in summer term (May - August)
Q/R/S/T 0.25 course offered within a regular session
U 0.25 course offered in other than a regular session
W/X 1.0 accelerated course (full course offered in one term)
Y 0.5 course offered in other than a regular session
Z 0.5 essay course offered in other than a regular session

Glossary


Prerequisite

A course that must be successfully completed prior to registration for credit in the desired course.


Corequisite

A course that must be taken concurrently with (or prior to registration in) the desired course.


Antirequisite

Courses that overlap sufficiently in course content that both cannot be taken for credit.


Essay Courses

Many courses at Western have a significant writing component. To recognize student achievement, a number of such courses have been designated as essay courses and will be identified on the student's record (E essay full course; F/G/Z essay half-course).


Principal Courses

A first year course that is listed by a department offering a module as a requirement for admission to the module. For admission to an Honors Specialization module or Double Major modules in an Honors Bachelor degree, at least 3.0 courses will be considered principal courses.



Campus





Course Level






Course Type




Classical Studies


An introduction to the ancient world, with emphasis on the cultural and social life and achievements of Greece and Rome. Among the topics to be considered are: magic, religion, philosophy, literature, archaeology, architecture, art, the structure of society and the position of women, slavery, everyday life, law, sport, warfare, medicine.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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A study of Greek and Roman mythology, with some reference to its influence in modern European literature.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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A study of the nature of sport and recreation, and of the attitudes towards them in the societies of the ancient world, principally Greece and Rome.

Antirequisite(s): Classical Studies 3903F/G if taken in Winter 2009.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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This course is an introduction to crime and criminal law in ancient Greece and Rome. Modern criminology may provide comparison and perspective. Readings may include law, rhetoric, philosophy, drama, and/or historiography. No previous knowledge of Greece and Rome is necessary and all readings are in English.

Antirequisite(s): The former CS 2905A/B (if taken in 2011-12, 2012-13).

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines the expansion of the Roman Empire, the people conquered by Rome and their place within the empire by surveying the history, literature and material culture of the Roman Empire's provinces and cosmopolitan cities from Rome's foundation to the rise of Christianity.

Antirequisite(s): The former CS 2908A/B (if taken in 2011-12, 2012-13).

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Alexander III of Macedon, although only thirty-two when he died in 323 BC, is arguably one of the most significant figures in all recorded history. This course examines his background, campaigns, plans and personality. It also considers reasons for the very divergent views about him today.

Antirequisite(s): The former CS 2902B (if taken in 2008-09, 2009-10), CS 2905B (if taken in 2010-11) and CS 2904B (if taken 2011-12, 2012-13).

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines the characters, policies, and actions of famous and infamous Roman emperors. It examines the virtues of the best emperors, the depravities of the worst emperors, and how these men are judged, using literary, documentary and archaeological evidence to see how their reputations have evolved over time.

Antirequisite(s): The former Classical Studies 2903A (if taken in 2014-15, 2016-17) and the former Classical Studies 2903B (if taken in 2014-15).

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course looks at the growth of urbanization in the Near East and Mediterranean from the Neolithic through the Roman Imperial periods. The course uses archaeological remains and historical sources to understand organization, social structure and evolution of early cities.

Antirequisite(s): The former CS 2902A/B (if taken in 2011-12, 2012-13).

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is a broad introduction to the world of Egyptian art and architecture. Starting with the Predynastic period, we will trace the major trends of Egyptian visual culture and conclude with the New Kingdom. Emphasis will be placed on learning these trends within their cultural and historical context.

Antirequisite(s): The former Classical Studies 2908A (if taken in 2013-14. 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17) and the former Classical Studies 2908B (if taken in 2013-14, 2015-16).

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A survey of technological and engineering principles in antiquity; of materials including their development and applications; of machinery in all its variety and of "missed opportunities".

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course considers the dawn and development in the ancient Greek city-states of the natural sciences. Scientific topics discussed include the Near Eastern heritage, cosmology, "the inquiry concerning nature", physics, astronomy, mathematics, biology, medicine, techniques of proof and demonstration, and theory construction. Relevant non-scientific topics include magic, astrology, and divination.

Antirequisite(s): The former CS 2902B (if taken in 2010-11) and the former CS 2903A/B (if taken in 2012-13).

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is intended as a practical means of enhancing English vocabulary through a systematic study of the contribution of the Classical languages to modern English, including the vocabulary of the sciences.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course introduces students to epic films set in ancient Greece. Besides detailed discussion of individual films, topics covered will include how and why events are selected and portrayed in film, the differences between history and Hollywood mythology, history and fiction, and conventions of the Greek epic.

Antirequisite(s): The former CS 2903B (if taken in 2011-12) and Film Studies 2198A/B (if taken in 2011-12).

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 3-hour screening.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines the life and times of Cleopatra in Egyptian and Roman history, ancient art and coinage. The Cleopatra we know is the Cleopatra of myth and fantasy as well. We also look at the reception of her image from antiquity to the present in literature, art, and film.

Antirequisite(s): The former Classical Studies 2902B (if taken in 2015-16, 2016-17).

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This intensive 3-week long study tour to Greece offers students a unique international learning experience. Ancient Greek History, literature and culture will be discussed in direct relation to the physical remains museums and archaeological sites, such as the Athenian Acropolis, Delphi, Olympia and Mycenae.

Prerequisite(s): Any Classical Studies course on the 1000-2999 level and permission of the instructor.

Extra Information: Field trip to Greece, minimum 39 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This intensive 3-week long study tour to Italy offers students a unique international learning experience. Roman history, literature and culture will be discussed in direct relation to the physical remains in museums and archaeological sites, such as the Forum Romanum, the Colosseum, the Vatican Museum and Pompeii.

Prerequisite(s): Any Classical Studies course on the 1000-2999 level and permission of the instructor.

Extra Information: Field trip to Italy, minimum of 39 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A selection of major plays studied principally as works of drama and on a thematic basis. Problems of staging and production in the ancient theatre will be considered, along with modern attempts to recreate the plays under wholly different circumstances.

Prerequisite(s): Classical Studies 1000, Latin 2000 or the former Latin 222, Greek 2000 or the former Greek 222, or English 1020E or English 1024E or the former English 026.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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A study of the prose fiction of the Greek and Roman world.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will consider the tradition of epic poetry in Ancient Greece through a reading of the central texts, focusing on the Iliad and the Odyssey. The lectures will seek not only to examine the particular characteristics of each poem, but also to situate these texts within the larger framework of literary and cultural history.

Antirequisite(s): The former Classical Studies 3101F/G and Classical Studies 3906F/G if taken in 2009.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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In this course we will read (in English) a selection of Roman epic poetry. We will use the poems as the basis for discussions on many different topics, including mythology, literary and cultural history, rhetorical devices, and the history of poetry.

Antirequisite(s): The former Classical Studies 3101F/G and Classical Studies 3904F/G if taken in 2010.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A political, cultural, and literary history of Rome from the assassination of Julius Caesar to the ascension of Tiberius. Readings from secondary sources will complement our study of Augustan coinage, sculpture, painting, monuments, poetry and prose. What can we conclude about the ideology of the age? What made it unique?

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines the religious practices of a variety of cults in Greco-Roman antiquity, studying the ways in which these were influenced by features such as magic, philosophical thought, politics and culturally specific expectations of class and gender.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course introduces students to the ritual-based polytheistic religion of the Ancient Greeks. We will explore the interaction of mythic texts and material culture through a focus on the representation of ritual practice in order to better understand how those practices operate within the larger structures of Greek society.

Antirequisite(s): The former Classical Studies 3903F (if taken in 2013-14) and the former Classical Studies 3903G (if taken in 2015-16).

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores how lies, cheating, and all forms of deviancy become a part of cultural identity in Ancient Greece through representation of the trickster figure. This course will also involve comparison of ancient tricksters with West African, Caribbean, Native American, First Nations, and other modern trickster figures.

Antirequisite(s): The former CS 3904F (if taken in 2012-13).

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is designed to give students insight into ancient Greek and Roman sexuality using the artistic evidence of erotic vase-paintings, sculpture, wall-paintings, and everyday objects in combination with ancient literary sources on sexual themes. Topics examined include phallic symbolism, homosexuality, prostitution, male-to-female lovemaking, hermaphrodites, and transvestism.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores why people fight and examines three profound military revolutions in the Near East, Greece and Rome. Topics include the Greco-Persian and the Peloponnesian Wars and the expansion of the Roman Empire. Attention will also be given to the careers of Alexander the Great, Hannibal and Caesar.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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This course examines material and theoretical aspects of travel and geography in the ancient world in order to understand how the ancient Greeks and Romans perceived their world and moved around in it. It uses artifacts from illuminated maps to shipwrecks, and primary sources including travel narratives and descriptive geographies.

Antirequisite(s): The former Classical Studies 3904G (if taken in 2013-14) and the former Classical Studies 3903F (if taken in 2016-17).

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An investigation of the construction of gender and the lives of women in ancient Greece. The evidence of texts and images from Greek antiquity will be considered from a variety of theoretical perspectives.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An investigation of the construction of gender and the lives of women in ancient Rome. The evidence of texts and images from Roman antiquity will be considered from a variety of theoretical perspectives.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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(Classical Studies 3400E, 3410E or 3450E counts as a principal course towards the Honors Specialization in History). A survey course emphasizing the 5th century B.C., 1st centuries B.C. and A.D., with introductory lectures on historical methodology and the Ancient Near East.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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(Classical Studies 3400E, 3410E or 3450E counts as a principal course towards the Honors Specialization in History) A survey of the history of Greece from the Bronze Age to the death of Cleopatra. By analyzing the social and political structures we will explore the reasons for the tremendous success of this civilization. Special emphasis will be given to interpreting and understanding the ancient source material.

Antirequisite(s): Classical Studies 3400E.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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(Classical Studies 3400E,<a href="Courses.cfm?CourseAcadCalendarID=MAIN_022819_1&SelectedCalendar=Live&ArchiveID=">3410E or 3450E counts as a principal course towards the Honors Specialization in History) This course is a survey of Roman history from the founding of the city in the eighth century BCE to the decline of Roman power in the late empire. The course is intended as a mixture of Roman history (chronological narrative) and analysis of primary source material.

Antirequisite(s): Classical Studies 3400E.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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This course explores the world of the late Roman Empire from the "crisis" of the third century AD onward, including figures such as Constantine the Great and Julian the Apostate. It examines the political, religious, intellectual and social history of the late Empire through literature, documentary texts, and material culture.

Antirequisite(s): The former CS 3905G (if taken in 2012-13).

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A survey of Greek and Roman panel and wall painting, focusing on examples from Classical Athens, royal Macedonian tombs, and frescos of the Late Republic and Early Empire in Rome and Pompeii and Herculaneum. Emphasis will be placed on the social and historical meaning of these panel and wall paintings.

Antirequisite(s): The former Classical Studies 3903G if taken in 2010.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A survey of the archaeology of the Bronze Age Aegean (c. 3200-1050 BCE) focusing on the material culture of the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations.

Prerequisite(s): Classical Studies 1000 or permission of instructor.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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A survey of the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from the Dark Ages through the Classical period (1050 - 323 BCE), focusing on the architecture, sculpture, and painting of the 6th and 5th centuries (c. 600 - 400 BCE), and the meaning and function of material culture in ancient Greek society.

Antirequisite(s): The former CS 3900E (if taken in 2011-12) and Visual Arts History 2247E.

Prerequisite(s): Classical Studies 1000 or permission of instructor.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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An examination of the archaeological evidence pertaining to Italy and Rome from 1000 BC to 300 AD. The course looks at the Etruscans and Greeks in Italy, the founding of Rome, and the development of the city through the Republican and Imperial periods.

Prerequisite(s): Classical Studies 1000 or permission of instructor.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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An examination of the archaeological evidence from the provinces of the Roman Empire. The course considers the historical background of Roman conquest and examines the archaeological remains of the cities and monuments in the eastern and western Roman provinces.

Antirequisite(s): CS 3901E (if taken in 2012-13).

Prerequisite(s): Classical Studies 1000 or permission of instructor.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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In this course we examine ancient Greek discourse about the city-state or polis. Readings (in translation) include Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and Politics. For these works, we will consider the themes of force, rationality, virtue, personal honor, happiness, justice, and the political organization of the community.

Antirequisite(s): Classical Studies 3900E if taken in 2008-09.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An examination of how pop culture in the 20th and 21st centuries has explored, adapted, and appropriated topics and themes from ancient Greece and Rome. Media considered may include: films, TV, novels, comic books, music, video games, online media, or anything falling within a broad definition of “pop culture”.

Antirequisite(s): The former Classical Studies 3906G (if taken in 2015-16).

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Attention will be focused on a specific period of Greek history. Original source material will be studied and analyzed.


Extra Information: 3 lecture/tutorial hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A specific period of Roman history will be studied, with use of original literary, numismatic and inscriptional sources.


Extra Information: 3 lecture/tutorial hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course comprises an independent archaeological research project drawing on some aspect of the Greek (CS 4512F/G) or Roman (CS 4552F/G) field practicum.

Prerequisite(s): CS 4512F/G or CS 4552F/G and permission of the department.

Extra Information: 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course provides practicum experience in a Greek archaeology field school or excavation.

Prerequisite(s): 0.5 Classical Studies course at the 3000-3999 level and permission of the department.

Extra Information: Field school, four weeks minimum.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course provides practicum experience in a Roman archaeology field school or excavation.

Prerequisite(s): 0.5 Classical Studies course at the 3000-3999 level and permission of the department.

Extra Information: Field school, four weeks minimum.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is a 6-week study abroad experience in northern England. Students participate five days per week on the archaeological excavation at the Roman fort at Vindolanda, learning practical techniques of field archaeology. Weekends are spent taking field trips to the historical sites of Northern England and Scotland.

Prerequisite(s): 0.5 Classical Studies course at the 3000-3999 level and permission of the department.

Extra Information: Field trip to Great Britain.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The course comprises the research component of the Vindolanda Field School. Students will write a research paper focused on some aspect of Roman history or archaeology. These papers should be related to or inspired by the student's experiences at Vindolanda but need not be about the site itself.

Prerequisite(s): CS 4580F/G and permission of the instructor.

Extra Information: 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Instruction in selection of topic, directed readings, research and writing of thesis. Restricted to fourth year students normally registered in the Honors Specialization in Classical Studies with a modular average of at least 80%. Application to the Undergraduate Chair of Classical Studies will be required by the April preceding the student's final year.

Prerequisite(s): At least 1.0 course at the 3000-level in the discipline area of the thesis topic and permission of Department.

Extra Information: 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 1.00
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