Academic Calendar - 2018

Western University Academic Calendar. - 2018

Courses


Course Numbering

0001-0999* Pre-University level introductory courses
1000-1999 Year 1 courses
2000-4999 Senior-level undergraduate courses
5000-5999 Professional Degree courses in Dentistry, Education, Law, Medicine and Theology (MTS, MDiv)
6000-6999 Courses offered by Continuing Studies
9000-9999 Graduate Studies courses

* These courses are equivalent to pre-university introductory courses and may be counted for credit in the student's record, unless these courses were taken in a preliminary year. They may not be counted toward essay or breadth requirements, or used to meet modular admission requirements unless it is explicitly stated in the Senate-approved outline of the module.


Suffixes

no suffix 1.0 course not designated as an essay course
A 0.5 course offered in first term
B 0.5 course offered in second term
A/B 0.5 course offered in first and/or second term
E 1.0 essay course
F 0.5 essay course offered in first term
G 0.5 essay course offered in second term
F/G 0.5 essay course offered in first and/or second term
H 1.0 accelerated course (8 weeks)
J 1.0 accelerated course (6 weeks)
K 0.75 course
L 0.5 graduate course offered in summer term (May - August)
Q/R/S/T 0.25 course offered within a regular session
U 0.25 course offered in other than a regular session
W/X 1.0 accelerated course (full course offered in one term)
Y 0.5 course offered in other than a regular session
Z 0.5 essay course offered in other than a regular session

Glossary


Prerequisite

A course that must be successfully completed prior to registration for credit in the desired course.


Corequisite

A course that must be taken concurrently with (or prior to registration in) the desired course.


Antirequisite

Courses that overlap sufficiently in course content that both cannot be taken for credit.


Essay Courses

Many courses at Western have a significant writing component. To recognize student achievement, a number of such courses have been designated as essay courses and will be identified on the student's record (E essay full course; F/G/Z essay half-course).


Principal Courses

A first year course that is listed by a department offering a module as a requirement for admission to the module. For admission to an Honors Specialization module or Double Major modules in an Honors Bachelor degree, at least 3.0 courses will be considered principal courses.



Campus





Course Level






Course Type




First Nations Studies


An interdisciplinary survey of First Nations issues, from academic and community perspectives including indigenous knowledge, historical background, oral history, socio-political context, arts, language and culture. Specific practical examples will be explored by researchers and community members actually engaged in their contemporary documentation and resolution.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Through the in-depth examination of Iroquoian (Mohawk) language, mythology, legends, and ceremonial texts, this course offers an introduction to the unique world view of the Iroquoian people and an examination of its continuing relevance in contemporary Iroquoian society.

Antirequisite(s): The former Anthropology 2220E.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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A continuation of Algonquian language acquisition (e.g., Ojibwe) utilizing mythology, legends and ceremonial texts as the basis for examining a unique world view of the Algonquian peoples and their continuation and survival in contemporary Algonquian communities.

Prerequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2113.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Students will be introduced to the basics of the Lunaape (Delaware) language, a North American Indigenous language. Students will examine the relationships of that language to various culturally relevant concepts and historical experiences of the Lunaape people.

Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2253F/G taken Fall 2014.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An examination of issues surrounding First Nations, Inuit and M├ętis peoples since first contact. It explores the development of current relationships with the governments and peoples of Canada based on interaction with European powers, settlers and subsequent British and Canadian administrations. Indigenous historical knowledge and community perspectives will be emphasized.


Prerequisite(s): One of: First Nations Studies 1020E, Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E), Anthropology 1025F/G, History 1401E, History 1201E, the former History 1701E.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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In this course the student will learn the basics of a particular North American aboriginal language (Mohawk) and will examine the relationships of that language to various culturally relevant concepts.

Antirequisite(s): The former Anthropology 2112.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Students will learn the basics of a particular North American Aboriginal language (e.g., Ojibwe) and will examine the relationships of that language to various culturally relevant concepts.

Prerequisite(s): First Nations Studies 1020E, Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E) or Anthropology 1025F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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This course will examine the traditional cultures and culture areas of Native North America. Contemporary peoples will be compared in Canada and the United States as a product of different histories and different traditional ways of life.

Antirequisite(s): The former Anthropology 2214F/G.


Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An examination of natural resource development emphasizing the interplay between indigenous people, the state and transnational developers. Topics include: environmentalism and livelihood; land rights; corporate power and state policies; common property and community-based resource management; NGOs in environmental politics; sustainability and the greening of development.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2203F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An introduction to the Caribbean and circum-Caribbean, emphasizing religion, aesthetic styles, current political processes, and relationships of the region and its peoples to Canada.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2211F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The cultures of Polynesia, Micronesia and Melanesia with an emphasis on indigenous social structures. Other topics include ecology and economy, male-female relations, ritual and cosmology, hierarchical and egalitarian political systems, Pacific history, and contemporary political and economic issues.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2212F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The cultural history of Latin American societies. Topics include the historical formation of indigenous communities, and a wide variety of contemporary social problems in Latin America.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2216F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Cultural and linguistic areas of Canada, subsistence patterns, social and political organization, religion, ethnohistory of the fur trade and Metis, treaties, accessing First Nations viewpoints.

Antirequisite(s): The former Anthropology 2217F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Education, land claims, sovereignty, social justice, hunting and fishing rights, co-management of resources, spirituality, pow-wows, oral history, language maintenance; media representation, cross-cultural mis-communication, Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples.

Antirequisite(s): The former Anthropology 2218F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The prehistoric societies of Ontario and surrounding areas. Topics include the entry of humans into the New World and their arrival in Ontario; development of agriculture; appearance of historic period societies such as the Huron, Neutral and Ojibwa; impact of European settlement and economic systems on native societies.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2233F/G.


Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will focus primarily on the prehistory of the Peruvian Andes and Coast, with some overlap into Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile and Amazonia. We will study the area's archaeological record in some detail, touching on a variety of themes that are of general archaeological interest, e.g. agricultural origins, trade, the rise of complex societies, the role of religious ideology, and the interpretation of archaeological evidence.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2234F/G.


Extra Information: 3 hours. Students intending to apply for the Archaeological Summer Field Course in Peru are strongly encouraged to take this course first (Main).

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is also offered at:

Brescia

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This course will focus primarily on the prehistory of the Peruvian Andes and Coast, with some overlap into Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile and Amazonia. We will study the area's archaeological record in some detail, touching on a variety of themes that are of general archaeological interest, e.g. agricultural origins, trade, the rise of complex societies, the role of religious ideology, and the interpretation of archaeological evidence.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2234F/G.


Extra Information: 3 hours. Students intending to apply for the Archaeological Summer Field Course in Peru are strongly encouraged to take this course first (Main).

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is also offered at:

Western Main Campus

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Introduction to the plurality of indigenous spiritual traditions in North America, and their diversity, complexity, and vitality. Included is an understanding of traditional ceremonies, cosmology or world view, creation stories and other narrative forms, cultural values, healers, and medicine. Special attention is given to Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee nations.

Antirequisite(s): Religious Studies 2236A/B.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 course.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An introduction to the decorative expressions of selected North American Indigenous peoples, from before contact to the present, providing descriptions of manufacture and use with culturally relevant explanations for non-ritual and ritual applications. Students will have the opportunity to understand and appreciate Indigenous worldviews through artistic expressions in daily life.

Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2254F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An introduction to the decorative expression of Iroquoian peoples, from before contact to the present, providing descriptions of manufacture and use with culturally relevant explanations for non-ritual and ritual applications. Students will have the opportunity to understand and appreciate the Iroquoian worldview through its artistic expressions in daily life.

Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2255F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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First Nations women have exercised considerable power and authority, both domestic and political, in their traditional cultures. Aboriginal women live within a value system that sees them as having a different but equally valid role in society. These values will be contrasted to those of mainstream Canadian society.


Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The consequences of physical environmental change for Indigenous communities around the globe will be examined in relation to the processes of colonialism and environmental dispossession. Topics include: identity, culture, local economies, social functioning, food security and health.

Antirequisite(s): Geography 2411F/G.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course from Geography 1100, Geography 1300A/B, Geography 1400F/G, Geography 1500F/G, Geography 2131A/B, Geography 2153A/B (taken after September 2012), or First Nations Studies 1020E; Women's Studies 1020E, Health Sciences 1001A/B and Health Sciences 1002A/B, or the former Health Sciences 1000; Sociology 1020, Sociology 1021E, Sociology 1025A/B, Sociology 1026F/G, Sociology 1027A/B or enrolment in the Major in Ecosystem Health or in any of the Globalization Studies modules, or permission from the Instructor.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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First Nations peoples are the original inhabitants of Canada. This course will examine history recorded since European contact with all possible efforts to privilege an Aboriginal point of view and the contribution Aboriginal peoples have made and continue to make to Canada as a nation-state and as a cultural community.

Antirequisite(s): History 2209E.

Prerequisite(s): First Nations Studies 1020E or Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E) Anthropology 1025F/G or History 1201E or History 1401E.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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An overview of first contacts between Indigenous People and Europeans in the Americas. First contact took many forms - from prophecy to physical meetings - since the late 1400s. Students will use a combination of primary and secondary sources to explore a series of different first contacts throughout the Americas.

Antirequisite(s): History 2811F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An examination of the culture and history of the Iroquoian Peoples from European contact to present day as presented by historical and contemporary writings and interpretation of events. Students will use a combination of primary and secondary sources drawn from both Iroquoian and Non-Iroquoian traditions.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in second year or higher of any program.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of current interest in the First Nations. List of special topics may be available in the Program office.

Prerequisite(s): Third of fourth year registration in any program with approval of the Director.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of interest in First Nations Studies. List of topics may be available in the Program's office.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third year in any program.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Topic available in the office of First Nations Studies.

Prerequisite(s): One 2000-level First Nations course or permission of the Director of First Nations Studies.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Individual reading and research of current interest in First Nations topics. Students must make arrangements with a Professor in the First Nations Studies program. An application must be completed with approval from the Instructor and the Director. Applications are available in the First Nations Studies office.

Prerequisite(s): Third of fourth year registration in any program with approval of the Director.

Extra Information: Hours to be arranged with the Instructor.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Indigenous knowledge, as a distinctive field of study, is emerging as an important tool in the movement toward self determination and empowerment. This course will examine Indigenous beliefs, ways of knowing, and worldviews to understand their differences and similarities, while exploring contemporary expressions through a variety of sources and interpretations.

Prerequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2217F/G or First Nations Studies 2901E or History 2209E or the former Anthropology 2217F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students will learn basic Indigenous music philosophy and apply this knowledge through practical singing and performative experience while examining the philosophical disposition of Indigenous music. Students will come away from this course with practical experience and experiential knowledge of Indigenous music (traditional cultural or contemporary).

Antirequisite(s): FNS 3001F/G taken Fall 2013 or Fall 2014.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Political and legal issues are inseparable in contemporary examinations of land use, self-determination, governance, individual and community rights. This course will examine the legal institutions and practices of traditional First Nations cultures as well as contemporary practice.

Antirequisite(s): Political Science 3398F/G.

Prerequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2218F/G or First Nations Studies 2901E or Anthropology 2218F/G or History 2209E or History 2201E or History 2205E or the former History 2207F/G or Political Science 2103A/B or Political Science 2230E or Political Science 2234E, or Law 2101 or Women's Studies 2260.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Representations of the First Nations, particularly by First Nations writers and artists. Folklore, art, oral tradition, fiction, poetry and drama analyzed in relation to performance of First Nations identity in contemporary Canadian society.

Antirequisite(s): The former Anthropology 3317F/G.

Prerequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2217F/G or First Nations Studies 2218F/G or the former Anthropology 2217F/G or the former Anthropology 2218F/G and registration in Year 3 or 4 in any module.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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North American aboriginal texts in English. The course may include a variety of genres, including oral traditions, narrative, poetry, drama, and film.

Antirequisite(s): The former English 3880F/G.

Prerequisite(s): 1000-level English or First Nations Studies 1020E.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of current interest in First Nations Studies. List of special topics may be vailable from the First Nations Studies office.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year in any program.

Extra Information: 3 seminar/lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of current interest in First Nations Studies. Consult the First Nations Studies Office for the current topic.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year in any program or by special permission of the Director.

Extra Information: 3 seminar/lecture hours

Course Weight: 1.00
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Individual reading and research of current interest in First Nations topics. Student must make arrangements with a Professor in the First Nations Studies program. An application must be completed with approval from the Instructor and the Director. Applications are available in the First Nations Studies office.

Prerequisite(s): Fourth year registration in any program with the approval of the Director.

Extra Information: Hours to be arranged with the Instructor.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An advanced seminar course combining in-class discussions of theoretical texts, research papers alongside community-based research. Students will be trained in appropriate methodologies and ethics of working with First Nations Communities. Areas of research and instruction may include land claims, self-government, education, health care, and urban issues.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year, a 70% average in First Nations Studies, 1.5 courses from First Nations Studies 3140F/G, the former First Nations Studies 3141F/G, First Nations Studies 3306F/G, First Nations Studies 3722F/G, First Nations Studies 3911F/G, First Nations Studies 3921F/G, First Nations Studies 3971F/G, or permission of the instructor.

Extra Information: 3.0 hours seminar/field school (practicum).

Course Weight: 1.00
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This is an advanced community-based experiential course that combines in-class discussions with community based research. Students will train in methodologies and ethics of working with First Nations communities. Areas of research may include but not limited to ecological restoration, land claims, self-government, education, health and wellness and urban issues.

Antirequisite(s): Geography 3000Y, Geography 3001F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department and in third or fourth year of a First Nations Studies Module.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Ethical research in First Nations Studies depends on respect for traditional cultural and social practices. The course will examine the underlying philosophical assumptions around social and political life among various Canadian First Nations. Successful cross-cultural communication depends on this intersection of ethical and epistemological premises.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in at least third year. First Nations Studies 3722F/G and 0.5 course from First Nations Studies 3140F/G or First Nations Studies 3141F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Concepts of Indigenous law and justice are explored, initially within their contexts of origin and later in relation to settler state concepts of law and justice. Additionally, students will gain an understanding of past legal decisions regarding Indigenous peoples that form the basis of contemporary Indigenous law in Canada.

Antirequisite(s): FNS 4001F/G taken Fall 2011 or Fall 2012.


Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students will research a variety of specialized historical subjects relating to political, social, and economic interactions with non-Natives. After sampling secondary writings, student will draw on archival, visual, and oral records to offer first-hand experiences in dealing with the complexity of source materials.

Antirequisite(s): History 4203F/G.

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 First Nations Studies or History courses at the 2200 level or above.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course offers students practical skills to conduct historical research into land claims and their historical context in Canada. The course focuses upon government documents and explores topics including oral history, comprehensive and specific claims process, claims and the courts, role of industry, and governments' duty to consult First Nations.

Antirequisite(s): History 4817F/G.

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 First Nations Studies or History courses at the 2200 level or above.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines Indigenous constructions of history as well as issues and tensions between Indigenous peoples and the contemporary discipline of history. Themes will include Indigenous historical methodologies (including but not limited to oral histories), re-examining the colonial historic record, and contemporary Tribal Nation history projects.

Antirequisite(s): History 4815F/G, History 4298F if taken in 2011.

Prerequisite(s): History 2209E or FNS 2901E; and one other History course at the 2200 level or above, or one FNS 2000-level course or above.

Extra Information: 2 seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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