Academic Calendar - 2018

Western University Academic Calendar. - 2018

Courses


Course Numbering

0001-0999* Pre-University level introductory courses
1000-1999 Year 1 courses
2000-4999 Senior-level undergraduate courses
5000-5999 Professional Degree courses in Dentistry, Education, Law, Medicine and Theology (MTS, MDiv)
6000-6999 Courses offered by Continuing Studies
9000-9999 Graduate Studies courses

* These courses are equivalent to pre-university introductory courses and may be counted for credit in the student's record, unless these courses were taken in a preliminary year. They may not be counted toward essay or breadth requirements, or used to meet modular admission requirements unless it is explicitly stated in the Senate-approved outline of the module.


Suffixes

no suffix 1.0 course not designated as an essay course
A 0.5 course offered in first term
B 0.5 course offered in second term
A/B 0.5 course offered in first and/or second term
E 1.0 essay course
F 0.5 essay course offered in first term
G 0.5 essay course offered in second term
F/G 0.5 essay course offered in first and/or second term
H 1.0 accelerated course (8 weeks)
J 1.0 accelerated course (6 weeks)
K 0.75 course
L 0.5 graduate course offered in summer term (May - August)
Q/R/S/T 0.25 course offered within a regular session
U 0.25 course offered in other than a regular session
W/X 1.0 accelerated course (full course offered in one term)
Y 0.5 course offered in other than a regular session
Z 0.5 essay course offered in other than a regular session

Glossary


Prerequisite

A course that must be successfully completed prior to registration for credit in the desired course.


Corequisite

A course that must be taken concurrently with (or prior to registration in) the desired course.


Antirequisite

Courses that overlap sufficiently in course content that both cannot be taken for credit.


Essay Courses

Many courses at Western have a significant writing component. To recognize student achievement, a number of such courses have been designated as essay courses and will be identified on the student's record (E essay full course; F/G/Z essay half-course).


Principal Courses

A first year course that is listed by a department offering a module as a requirement for admission to the module. For admission to an Honors Specialization module or Double Major modules in an Honors Bachelor degree, at least 3.0 courses will be considered principal courses.



Campus





Course Level






Course Type




Pharmacology


A course for students in the BSc in Nursing and other Health Sciences programs as well as students in BMSc and BSc programs, to provide a basic understanding of the fundamentals of drug action and the mechanisms of action and therapeutic use of the important classes of drugs.

Antirequisite(s): Pharmacology 3620.

Pre-or Corequisite(s): One of Biology 1001A or Biology 1201A and one of Biology 1002B or Biology 1202B; or registration in the BSc in Nursing.

Extra Information: 1 tutorial hour (optional). Only offered online (Distance Studies).

Course Weight: 0.50
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A systems-based pharmacology course surveying the range of drugs used to treat disease processes affecting various organs of the body (e.g. cardiovascular disease, neurological diseases, etc.) with emphasis on drug targets, mechanisms of drug action, and adverse effects.

Prerequisite(s): Biochemistry 2280A, Biology 2382A/B. Pre-or Corequisite(s): Physiology 3120 is strongly recommended.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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This course will cover gastrointestinal secretion, motility, digestion, absorption, hepatic and pancreatic physiology. Specific areas will include: gut-brain-liver axis and nutrient metabolism, exocrine and endocrine pancreas, liver and lipid metabolism. Relevant pathologies and disease states, including obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome along with current therapeutic strategies will be covered.

Antirequisite(s): Physiology 4100A/B.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours. Cross-listed with Physiology 4100A/B.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Basic principles of cardiovascular pharmacology with particular emphasis on cellular mechanisms of drug action and mechanisms of therapeutic efficacy in disease states.

Prerequisite(s): Pharmacology 3620 and either Physiology and Pharmacology 3000E or the former Pharmacology 3580Z; or Physiology 3120; or Pharmacology 3620 and registration in Year 4 of a module in Pathology.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores how drugs and endogenous compounds mediate their biological effects through nuclear signalling pathways. The emphasis will be on aspects of gene regulation and signalling by nuclear hormone receptors - a family of ligand dependent transcription factors essential for normal metabolism, development and reproduction.

Prerequisite(s): Biochemistry 2280A and registration in Year 4, or permission of the Department.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Clinical pharmacology is a scientific and medical discipline dedicated to the bench-to-bedside study of drug action through an in-depth knowledge of human pharmacology and therapeutics. This course in clinical pharmacology focuses on fundamental concepts highlighted with examples from clinical cases, therapeutic applications and relevance to drug discovery and development.

Prerequisite(s): Pharmacology 3620.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the molecular pharmacology and therapeutic properties of anticancer agents. The focus is on molecular mechanisms of cancer chemotherapy, and will include drug resistance and the roles of receptor kinases and G protein-coupled receptors in existing and novel cancer therapies.

Prerequisite(s): Pharmacology 3620, or Physiology 3140A, or permission of the Department.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will cover the pharmacological and pathophysiological effects of non-medicinal drug use including mechanisms of action, tolerance and addiction, long-term effects, side effects and toxicity, treatment of addictions and overdoses. Pharmacokinetics will also be examined including routes of administration, activation, deactivation, elimination, and drug-drug interactions.

Prerequisite(s): Pharmacology 3620 or Physiology 3140A.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of drugs on the central and peripheral nervous systems. The focus will be on recent developments in the field of neuroscience and their impact on our understanding of the actions, and development of, new drugs.

Prerequisite(s): Pharmacology 3620; Physiology 3140A; or permission of the Department.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Contemporary use of medicines derived from natural sources. Regulatory aspects of their use and the scientific basis for assessment of efficacy, quality, and safety of these products will be discussed. The mechanism(s) of beneficial and harmful effects of selected natural health products, including herb-drug interactions, will be included.

Prerequisite(s): Pharmacology 3620 or permission of the Department.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours per week, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An examination of how mechanisms that regulate cell proliferation affect normal tissue repair and cause abnormalities, such as tumour formation and poor regeneration after injury. The course explores the basic molecular and cellular processes of relevant human disorders and the clinically useful pharmacological and regenerative medical therapies.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120; Physiology 3140A or Biology 3316A/B; Pharmacology 3620; or permission of the Department.

Extra Information: 2.0 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Drugs are designed to act on protein targets such as receptors, channels, exchangers and enzymes. This course explores the structures of these major targets and discusses how drugs are designed to treat dysfunction of the associated cell signaling pathways.


Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A course dealing with the pharmacological and toxicological principles underlying the adverse effects of xenobiotics in humans. In addition to reviewing mechanisms of toxicity in humans, the course will include overviews of the principles of management of human poisoning, the principles of chronic toxicity and of drug safety in humans.

Prerequisite(s): Pharmacology 3620 or permission of the Department.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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