Academic Calendar - 2018

Western University Academic Calendar. - 2018

Courses


Course Numbering

0001-0999* Pre-University level introductory courses
1000-1999 Year 1 courses
2000-4999 Senior-level undergraduate courses
5000-5999 Professional Degree courses in Dentistry, Education, Law, Medicine and Theology (MTS, MDiv)
6000-6999 Courses offered by Continuing Studies
9000-9999 Graduate Studies courses

* These courses are equivalent to pre-university introductory courses and may be counted for credit in the student's record, unless these courses were taken in a preliminary year. They may not be counted toward essay or breadth requirements, or used to meet modular admission requirements unless it is explicitly stated in the Senate-approved outline of the module.


Suffixes

no suffix 1.0 course not designated as an essay course
A 0.5 course offered in first term
B 0.5 course offered in second term
A/B 0.5 course offered in first and/or second term
E 1.0 essay course
F 0.5 essay course offered in first term
G 0.5 essay course offered in second term
F/G 0.5 essay course offered in first and/or second term
H 1.0 accelerated course (8 weeks)
J 1.0 accelerated course (6 weeks)
K 0.75 course
L 0.5 graduate course offered in summer term (May - August)
Q/R/S/T 0.25 course offered within a regular session
U 0.25 course offered in other than a regular session
W/X 1.0 accelerated course (full course offered in one term)
Y 0.5 course offered in other than a regular session
Z 0.5 essay course offered in other than a regular session

Glossary


Prerequisite

A course that must be successfully completed prior to registration for credit in the desired course.


Corequisite

A course that must be taken concurrently with (or prior to registration in) the desired course.


Antirequisite

Courses that overlap sufficiently in course content that both cannot be taken for credit.


Essay Courses

Many courses at Western have a significant writing component. To recognize student achievement, a number of such courses have been designated as essay courses and will be identified on the student's record (E essay full course; F/G/Z essay half-course).


Principal Courses

A first year course that is listed by a department offering a module as a requirement for admission to the module. For admission to an Honors Specialization module or Double Major modules in an Honors Bachelor degree, at least 3.0 courses will be considered principal courses.



Campus





Course Level






Course Type




Physiology


A survey course outlining the principles of human/mammalian physiology; general properties of the living cell and the internal environment; neural, muscle, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal and endocrine systems; metabolism, reproduction and homeostasis.


Prerequisite(s): Grade 12U (SBI4U) Biology and Grade 12U (SCH4U) Chemistry, or their equivalent. First year courses in Biology and Chemistry are recommended.

Extra Information: Limited to students enrolled in the Nursing program. 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 1.00
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An introductory course, outlining the principles of human/mammalian physiology along with a general survey of various physiological systems (e.g. cardiovascular, renal, neural, motor, gastrointestinal, endocrine, respiratory, etc.).


Prerequisite(s): Grade 12U Biology or its equivalent. Grade 12U Chemistry is recommended.

Extra Information: Limited to students enrolled in first year Kinesiology. 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 1.00
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A survey course outlining the principles of human/mammalian physiology: general properties of the living cell and internal environment; neural, muscle, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastro-intestinal, renal and endocrine system; metabolism, reproduction, and homeostasis.


Prerequisite(s): First-year courses in Biology and Chemistry are recommended.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 1.00
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A survey of the physiology of various systems (e.g. neural, endocrine, renal, cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, etc.) of the human.


Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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A survey of principles of cellular physiology including membrane, ion channel, receptor, and transport protein function, and signal transduction mechanisms.


Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will cover gastrointestinal secretion, motility, digestion, absorption, hepatic and pancreatic physiology. Specific areas will include: gut-brain-liver axis and nutrient metabolism, exocrine and endocrine pancreas, liver and lipid metabolism. Relevant pathologies and disease states, including obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome along with current therapeutic strategies will be covered.

Antirequisite(s): Pharmacology 4100A/B.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours. Cross-listed with Pharmacology 4100A/B.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines the normal pulmonary environment, including lung development and adaptations to high altitude and exercise, and a variety of pathophysiological conditions and processes. For each condition or disease, physiological abnormalities and current therapies will be discussed, as will pathophysiological mechanisms with some emphasis on chronic and acute inflammation.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A study of the integration of neural, metabolic and vascular factors that compete to simultaneously regulate blood pressure and blood flow during physical exercise in health and disease.

Antirequisite(s): Kinesiology 4432A/B.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120, and Physiology 3140A and either Physiology and Pharmacology 3000E or the former Physiology 3130Z.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours. Priority to students in Honors Specialization modules in Physiology, and Physiology and Pharmacology.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines the basic molecular, biochemical and morphological events that regulate pluripotent stem cell biology. Students will learn about the physiology, research principles and ethical issues that surround the generation and clinical use of pluripotent stem cells.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120 and Physiology 3140A.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Central concepts in regenerative medicine are explored, with a focus on the preclinical development of stem cell therapies. Emphasized are: fundamentals of tissue-specific (post-natal) stem cell isolation, expansion and functional characterization using xenotransplantation into immunodeficient mouse models for the treatment of human hematopoietic disorders, ischemic vascular diseases, diabetes and cancer.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120 and Physiology 3140A.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will provide an overview of the development and biology of skeletal tissues, introduce current techniques used to study skeletal physiology and examine the biological bases of common musculoskeletal diseases and their treatments.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120, Physiology 3140A and either Physiology and Pharmacology 3000E or the former Physiology 3130Z; or Physiology 3120 (with a mark of at least 75%) and Physiology 3140A.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Diseases related to ion channels, including epilepsy, congenital hearing loss, immunodeficiency and cardiac arrhythmias. The physiology and pathophysiology of relevant ion channels will be covered.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120 and Physiology 3140A.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A study of the regulation of the circulation including factors involved in the regulation of cardiac output, reflex control of the circulation and long-term control of arterial pressure.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Selected topics in reproduction and its endocrine regulation.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120, Physiology 3140A and either Physiology and Pharmacology 3000E or the former Physiology 3130Z; or Physiology 3120 (with a mark of at least 75%) and Physiology 3140A.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A study of the neural control of movement in mammals. Topics include normal and abnormal function of muscle receptors, spinal reflexes, cerebellum, basal ganglia and motor areas of cerebral cortex.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120, Physiology 3140A and either Physiology and Pharmacology 3000E or the former Physiology 3130Z; or Neuroscience 2000, Physiology 3140A and registration in Year 4 of an Honors Specialization in Neuroscience.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Mechanisms underlying the development of selected organs and organ systems in mammals: brain and peripheral nervous system, heart and vascular system, lungs, kidneys, gonads and associated reproductive structures, gastrointestinal tract, and limbs. Emphasis is on the biochemical and morphological maturation pathway that equips each system for its physiological role.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120 and Physiology 3140A.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The hypothalamus and limbic system contribute to the neural integration of autonomic, endocrine and skeletomotor responses which contribute to homeostasis and adaptive behaviors. Topics include the regulation of neuroendocrine function, blood pressure, energy and water balance, circadian rhythms and the integration of reproductive function.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120 and 3140A; or Neuroscience 2000, Physiology 3140A and registration in Year 4 of an Honors Specialization in Neuroscience.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Body fluid compartments and kidney function.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120, and Physiology 3140A and either Physiology and Pharmacology 3000E or the former Physiology 3130Z.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A seminar course, by arrangement with the Department of Physiology.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120, and Physiology 3140A and either Physiology and Pharmacology 3000E or the former Physiology 3130Z.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Cellular function and communication in the central nervous system. Topics will cover physiological mechanisms of intrinsic neuronal activity, excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, integrative neuronal activities and protein processing pathways related to neuronal signalling and degeneration in Alzheimer's disease. Specific examples relevant to neuronal functions and dysregulations will be used.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120 and Physiology 3140A; or Neuroscience 2000, Physiology 3140A and registration in Year 4 of an Honors Specialization in Neuroscience.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course covers placental function (endocrine, nutrient transport and parturition), fetal growth and development (heart, brain, kidneys, vessels, adipose, liver, lung, muscle and pancreas) and deals with the concept of the fetus as a patient to be followed during poor in utero conditions, such as hypoxia or poor diet.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course covers the physiology of the senses in the primate, including touch, taste, pain, smell, vision, motion and hearing. Each sensory modality is used to exemplify a particular aspect of sensory processing from stimulus encoding at the periphery to the feature extraction in the sensory cerebral cortex.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120; or Neuroscience 2000, Physiology 3140A and registration in Year 4 of an Honors Specialization in Neuroscience.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Examines the basic principles and surveys molecular mechanisms of regulation of cell growth, adhesion, migration, and differentiation and their functional integration to support survival and development. Dysregulation of these processes in disease will also be examined. The course is composed of both lectures and student presentations of scientific literature.

Prerequisite(s): Physiology 3120.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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