Academic Calendar - 2024

Western University Academic Calendar. - 2024

Courses


Course Numbering

0001-0999* Pre-University level introductory courses
1000-1999 Year 1 courses
2000-4999 Senior-level undergraduate courses
5000-5999 Professional Degree courses in Dentistry, Education, Law, Medicine and Theology (MTS, MDiv)
6000-6999 Courses offered by Continuing Studies
9000-9999 Graduate Studies courses

* These courses are equivalent to pre-university introductory courses and may be counted for credit in the student's record, unless these courses were taken in a preliminary year. They may not be counted toward essay or breadth requirements, or used to meet modular admission requirements unless it is explicitly stated in the Senate-approved outline of the module.


Suffixes

no suffix 1.0 course not designated as an essay course
A 0.5 course offered in first term
B 0.5 course offered in second term
A/B 0.5 course offered in first and/or second term
E 1.0 essay course
F 0.5 essay course offered in first term
G 0.5 essay course offered in second term
F/G 0.5 essay course offered in first and/or second term
H 1.0 accelerated course (8 weeks)
J 1.0 accelerated course (6 weeks)
K 0.75 course
L 0.5 graduate course offered in summer term (May - August)
Q/R/S/T 0.25 course offered within a regular session
U 0.25 course offered in other than a regular session
W/X 1.0 accelerated course (full course offered in one term)
Y 0.5 course offered in other than a regular session
Z 0.5 essay course offered in other than a regular session

Glossary


Prerequisite

A course that must be successfully completed prior to registration for credit in the desired course.


Corequisite

A course that must be taken concurrently with (or prior to registration in) the desired course.


Antirequisite

Courses that overlap sufficiently in course content that both cannot be taken for credit.


Essay Courses

Many courses at Western have a significant writing component. To recognize student achievement, a number of such courses have been designated as essay courses and will be identified on the student's record (E essay full course; F/G/Z essay half-course).


Principal Courses

A first year course that is listed by a department offering a module as a requirement for admission to the module. For admission to an Honours Specialization module or Double Major modules in an Honours Bachelor degree, at least 3.0 courses will be considered principal courses.



Campus





Course Level






Course Type




Indigenous Studies


An interdisciplinary survey of Indigenous issues, from academic and community perspectives including indigenous knowledge, historical background, oral history, socio-political context, arts, language and culture. Specific practical examples will be explored by researchers and community members actually engaged in their contemporary documentation and resolution.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Students will be introduced to the basics of the Lunaape (Delaware) language, a North American Indigenous language. Students will examine the relationships of that language to various culturally relevant concepts and historical experiences of the Lunaape people.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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In this unique introductory course, students will learn the basic structural framework of the Mohawk language and, through that process -- standing (metaphorically) at the “edge of the woods” -- will transform how they view an Indigenous culture and its traditions in a collaborative, supportive learning environment.

Antirequisite(s): The former First Nations Studies 2112.

Extra Information: 3 hour lecture.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Students will learn the basics of a particular North American Aboriginal language (e.g., Ojibwe) and will examine the relationships of that language to various culturally relevant concepts.

Prerequisite(s): Any course in Arts and Humanities or Social Science.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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In this course students will learn the fundamentals of speaking the Oneida language. A variety of testing methods, including verbal and writing components, will be used to support language acquisition. At the end of the course, students should have developed a solid foundation for communicating in Oneida.

Antirequisite(s): The former First Nations Studies 3003 taken Summer 2016, 2017 or 2018.

Extra Information: 5 hour lecture, 4 days per week for 5 weeks.

Course Weight: 1.00
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An examination of natural resource development emphasizing the interplay between indigenous people, the state and transnational developers. Topics include: environmentalism and livelihood; land rights; corporate power and state policies; common property and community-based resource management; NGOs in environmental politics; sustainability and the greening of development.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2203F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Canadian history has relied on nationalist interpretations that reduce the role of Indigenous People. This course challenges these ideas by demonstrating the permanency of Indigenous Peoples and the continuity of their beliefs, practices, and political systems. Topics discussed include the Northwest Resistance, the World Wars, and the TRC.

Antirequisite(s): The former History 2209E, the former Indigenous Studies 2901E, History 2210F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Indigenous Studies 1020E, or 1.0 course in History at the 1000-level or above, or 1.0 course in Anthropology at the 1000-level or above.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour. Cross-listed with History 2210F/G.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An introduction to the Caribbean and circum-Caribbean, emphasizing religion, aesthetic styles, current political processes, and relationships of the region and its peoples to Canada.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2211F/G.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Focusing on the cultures of Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia, this course reveals how people often understood as peripheral are at the centre of global processes. The course addresses topics including social structure, gender, politics, economies, ecologies, cosmologies, and the representation of Pacific peoples.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2212F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines key issues related to the history of Indigenous peoples in Canada. The time frame covers the pre-contact era to the 1969 White Paper. Topics may include: Aboriginal rights and title; treaty-making; colonial policy development; residential schools; relocation and centralization; child welfare; and the 1969 White Paper.

Antirequisite(s): The former First Nations Studies 2217F/G, the former Anthropology 2217F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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A journey into the political and economic history of the region that pays attention to the daily lives, as well as the momentous struggles, of its culturally diverse inhabitants. Topics covered include economic dependency and exploitation, urban poverty, social stratification, “race”, indigenous movements, state terror, peaceful resistance and revolution.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2216F/G.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores the critical challenges still faced by Indigenous peoples in Canada. The material covered will be timely and relevant, including: legal and political mobilization; jurisdictional authority and self-determination; land rights and treaty relationships; the Truth and Reconciliation Commission; and the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls inquiry.

Antirequisite(s): The former Anthropology 2218F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An overview and critical evaluation of reconstructions of past ways of life in the Arctic. The course will introduce Arctic cultures as understood through their material remains, critically examine Arctic archaeology's ongoing colonial foundations, and explore how climate change impacts and decolonizing efforts are reshaping archaeological practice in the north.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2230F/G.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course focuses on the archaeology of the original societies of Ontario and surrounding areas, covering topics including: the arrival of people in Ontario, the development of agriculture, the appearance of historic period societies such as the Huron-Wendat, Attawandaron/Chonnonton, Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee, and the impacts of European settlement and economic systems.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2233F/G.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course focuses on the archaeology of the Peruvian Andes and Coast, with some overlap into Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile and Amazonia. We will study the area's archaeological record in some detail, touching on a variety of themes that are of general archaeological interest including agriculture, trade, religion, the rise of large-scale societies, and the interpretation of archaeological evidence.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2234F/G.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is also offered at:

Brescia

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This course focuses on the archaeology of the Peruvian Andes and Coast, with some overlap into Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile and Amazonia. We will study the area's archaeological record in some detail, touching on a variety of themes that are of general archaeological interest including agriculture, trade, religion, the rise of large-scale societies, and the interpretation of archaeological evidence.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2234F/G.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is also offered at:

Western Main Campus

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Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course focuses on endangered languages and the local and global factors affecting language vitality and revival. Practical strategies for sustaining and reviving languages, including language documentation and revitalization, will be addressed with examples coming from various areas of the world and special focus on Indigenous languages of the Americas.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2253A/B.

Extra Information: 3 hours per week, cross-listed with Anthropology 2253A/B.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An introduction to the decorative expression of Iroquoian peoples, from before contact to the present, providing descriptions of manufacture and use with culturally relevant explanations for non-ritual and ritual applications. Students will have the opportunity to understand and appreciate the Iroquoian worldview through its artistic expressions in daily life.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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First Nations women have exercised considerable power and authority, both domestic and political, in their traditional cultures. Aboriginal women live within a value system that sees them as having a different but equally valid role in society. These values will be contrasted to those of mainstream Canadian society.

Prerequisite(s): One of: First Nations Studies 1020E, Anthropology 1025F/G, Sociology 1020, Sociology 1021E, GSWS 1020E.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The consequences of physical environmental change for Indigenous communities around the globe will be examined in relation to the processes of colonialism and environmental dispossession. Topics include: identity, culture, local economies, social functioning, food security and health.

Antirequisite(s): Geography 2411F/G.


Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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For Haudenosaunee the landscape is an animate, living and embodied archive with which we are all interconnected. This studio-based course involves community engagement learning where students will create site-specific artworks that explore our (inter)relationships with the living archive of ‘place’, while inspired by the rich cultural histories of this territory.

Antirequisite(s): Studio Art 2676A/B.

Prerequisite(s): Indigenous Studies 1020E or Studio Art 1601 or Studio Art 1605, or the former VAS 1020, or the former VAS 1025, or 1.0 from Art History 1640 or the former VAH 1040 or two of Art History 1641A/B – 1648A/B or the former VAH 1041A/B – 1045A/B or permission of the Department.

Extra Information: 6 studio hours, lecture, blended or online format. Priority will be given to students registered in Indigenous Studies. Cross-listed with Studio Art 2676A/B.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines traditional and contemporary artforms created and performed by Indigenous women. Art as an expression of Indigenous women’s social, political, and spiritual realities is studied through readings, lectures, and artistic assignments. This course also considers Indigenous analyses, varied artistic styles, forms, and mediums, from Indigenous women across Canada.

Antirequisite(s): GSWS 2291F/G, Art History 2634F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Indigenous Studies 1020E, GSWS 1020E, or 1.0 course from GSWS 1021F/G, GSWS 1022F/G, GSWS 1023F/G, GSWS 1024F/G, or GSWS 1030F/G, or 1.0 from Art History 1640 or the former VAH 1040 or two of Art History 1641A/B-1648A/B or the former VAH 1041A/B – 1045A/B, or Classical Studies 1000, or permission of the Indigenous Studies Program.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours. Cross-listed with GSWS 2291F/G and Art History 2634F/G.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course, designed for a general audience, explores the Mohawk vocabulary in everyday situations. Students will learn to deconstruct the vocabulary to discover its underlying cultural references and how this reflects the values and world view of its speakers, as well as explore how the vocabulary has changed over time.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of 3.0 courses.

Extra Information: 3 hour lecture.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students explore Indigenous feminist frameworks and epistemologies to understand the participation of Indigenous women in social, political, and environmental movements. This course examines issues relating to the historical and contemporary experiences of Indigenous women feminists nationally and internationally. This course also considers Indigenous feminist analyses and Indigenous women’s issues.

Antirequisite(s): GSWS 2290F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Indigenous Studies 1020E or GSWS 1020E, or 1.0 course from GSWS 1021F/G, GSWS 1022F/G, GSWS1023 F/G, GSWS 1024F/G or GSWS 1030F/G, or special permission from the Program.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours. Cross-listed with GSWS 2290F/G.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An examination of the culture and history of the Iroquoian Peoples from European contact to present day as presented by historical and contemporary writings and interpretation of events. Students will use a combination of primary and secondary sources drawn from both Iroquoian and Non-Iroquoian traditions.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of current interest in the Indigenous Studies. List of special topics may be available in the Program office.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in any third or fourth year program with approval of the Director.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of interest in Indigenous Studies. List of topics may be available in the Program's office.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in any third or fourth year program with approval of the Director.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 1.00
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This individualized reading course allows students to focus on a topic relevant to Indigenous peoples in Canada. Each student must make arrangements with a Professor in the Indigenous Studies program. An application must be completed with approval from the Instructor and the Director. Applications are available in the Indigenous Studies office.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in any third or fourth year program with approval of the Director and a minimum 80% average.

Extra Information: Hours to be arranged with the Instructor.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Your introduction to Iroquoian culture and tradition through the Mohawk language began when you arrived at the “edge of the woods.” Now, having acquired the consent of the village, you may head towards it by “crossing the fields” and continuing on your learning journey of Mohawk language, culture, and tradition.

Antirequisite(s): The former Anthropology 2220E, the former First Nations Studies 2101E.

Prerequisite(s): Indigenous Studies 2104.

Extra Information: 3 hour lecture.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Indigenous knowledge, as a distinctive field of study, is emerging as an important tool in the movement toward self determination and empowerment. This course will examine Indigenous beliefs, ways of knowing, and worldviews to understand their differences and similarities, while exploring contemporary expressions through a variety of sources and interpretations.

Prerequisite(s): Any course in Arts and Humanities or Social Science and registration in third year or higher.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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In this interactive course students will learn the theoretical and practical foundations for conducting research with Indigenous communities. Discussions will focus on the history of research with Indigenous peoples; ethics, especially as it relates to protocols for using Indigenous knowledge(s); Indigenous research models; research agreements; and data governance (OCAP Principle).

Prerequisite(s): Indigenous Studies 2213F/G, or the former Anthropology 2217F/G, or the former FNS 2217F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The Indian Residential School System has been recognized by the Canadian Parliament as an act of genocide. This course explores the long history of residential schools in Canada, from early initiatives in New France in the 1640s through the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 2015.

Antirequisite(s): History 3267F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Indigenous Studies 1020E, or 1.0 course in History at the 1000-level or above, or 1.0 course in Anthropology at the 1000-level or above.

Extra Information: 2 hours. Cross-listed with History 3267F/G.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course offers students the opportunity to study current issues in language revitalization through participation in collaborative research projects on site with a community partner. Projects will vary depending on the needs of the community and the skillset brought by the students.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 3343A/B; Anthropology 3323A/B if taken in the Summer of 2016.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in year 3 or 4 of any module and permission of the instructor.

Extra Information: lecture/field work, 3 hours, 0.5 course. Recommended for students in Anthropology or Linguistics.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course offers an introduction to the interrelated dynamics of climate crisis and colonialism. The influence of geographies of epistemology, culture, place and power on climate change impacts, strategies, and outcomes is explored. Adopting an anti-colonialist framework and emphasizing inclusive Indigenous Kinship approaches the course moves from theory to action.

Antirequisite(s): Geography 3413F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Two full courses or equivalent in Indigenous Studies. Third or fourth year status at the University.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours. Cross-listed with Geography 3413F/G.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Political and legal issues are inseparable in contemporary examinations of land use, self-determination, governance, individual and community rights. This course will examine the legal institutions and practices of traditional Indigenous cultures as well as contemporary practice.



Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will introduce students to a diverse range of Indigenous storytelling practices from Turtle Island (North America), which may include oral narratives, literature, and visual and performance arts. Students will consider how these practices both shape and are shaped by specific historical and geographical contexts.

Antirequisite(s): English 3680F/G.

Prerequisite(s): 1000-level English or Indigenous Studies 1020E.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Special topics of current interest in Indigenous Studies. List of special topics may be available from the Indigenous Studies office.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in any fourth year program with approval of the Director.

Extra Information: 3 seminar/lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This individualized reading course allows students to focus on a topic relevant to Indigenous peoples in Canada. Each student must make arrangements with an instructor in the Indigenous Studies program. An application must be completed with approval from the Instructor and the Director. Applications are available in the Indigenous Studies office.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year Indigenous Studies with approval of the Director and a minimum 80% average.

Extra Information: Hours to be arranged with the Instructor.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An advanced seminar course combining in-class discussions of theoretical texts, research papers alongside community-based research. Students will be trained in appropriate methodologies and ethics of working with Indigenous Communities. Areas of research and instruction may include land claims, self-government, education, health care, and urban issues.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year Indigenous Studies with a minimum 70% average.

Extra Information: 3.0 hours seminar/field school (practicum).

Course Weight: 1.00
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This is an advanced community-based experiential course that combines in-class discussions with community based research. Students will train in methodologies and ethics of working with Indigenous communities. Areas of research may include but not limited to ecological restoration, land claims, self-government, education, health and wellness and urban issues.

Antirequisite(s): Geography 3000Y, Geography 3001F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in third or fourth year Indigenous Studies with a minimum 70% average.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will critically examine archival sciences relating to Indigenous peoples. Long perceived as politically neutral, the collection of records is now identified as an act of settler-colonialism that displaces Indigenous peoples and their historical practices. A class project, alongside relevant case studies, considers themes of power, intersectionality, and reconciliation.

Antirequisite(s): History 4806F/G.

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 Indigenous Studies courses at the 2000-level or above, or 2.0 History courses at the 2200-level or above.

Extra Information: 3 hours. Cross-listed with History 4806F/G.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This advanced course examines the critical issues and tensions of doing research with and for Indigenous peoples.. Themes will include Indigenous methodologies (including but not limited to oral histories), and decolonizing research.


Extra Information: 3 seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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